For The Greater Goods (sm)

Improving Children’s Behavior with Organic Foods

These days it seems you can’t go 24 hours without hearing stories of children with ADD or ADHD.  I’m 35 and I can’t ever remember any of my classmates having these kinds of issues back when I was in school.   Anyone can see that our S.A.D. (Sad American Diet) is playing a huge role in this and switching to organic food can make a great impact.  Most Americans are eating too much processed foods organic foodand not enough organic whole foods.  I’m not blaming it all on our diet. Of course I know that genetics and environment factors also play a part but remember this: just because you have a genetic factor does NOT mean you will get the disorder or disease.  That only happens 4% of the time the other 96% percent comes from our lifestyle choices and it’s up to us to make better choices for ourselves and our children.   Let’s take a look at a few things in the conventional diet that could be triggering behavioral issues in children.

Children’s Behavior + Non-Organic Foods

ALLERGENS

Allergens are in healthy foods, but if your body is sensitive to them, they might affect brain functions, triggering hyperactivity or inattentiveness. You might find it helpful to stop eating—one at a time—the top nine food allergens: wheat (gluten), milk, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, soy, fish, shellfish and corn. Starting a food journal with yourself and your children will help you find the culprit more quickly.

FOOD DYES:

Researchers have found that there may be a link between food dyes and hyperactivity and ADHD. The FDA requires FD&C Yellow No. 5, also called tartrazine, and FD&C Red No. 40, also called allura, to be listed on food packages. Other dyes may or may not be listed, but be cautious about anything colored before you put in your mouth or your kids mouth. Items to watch for: toothpaste, vitamins, fruit and sports drinks, hard candy, fruit-flavored cereals, barbecue sauce, canned fruit, fruit snacks, gelatin powders, cake mixes and the list goes on.  This is a good reason to read your labels.

SUGAR

We all should know by now that sugar is our enemy.  We need to stay far away from the stuff as much as possible and I have no doubt that sugar plays a HUGE roll in behavioral disorders.  Back in the 1800′s the average person consumed 10lbs of sugar a year, sounds like a lot huh?  But do you know how much the average person consumes today?  The average person today consumes 199lbs of sugar a year, that’s PER PERSON.   That’s pretty frightening don’t you think?  If I could stress one thing to you, it would be to cut out or at least cut down on sugar.  Read your labels, the average soda has 45-50grams of sugar in one can (12oz) can, that’s 12 tsp of sugar.

Poor nutrition can cause a child or adult with ADD/ADHD to become distracted, impulsive, and restless. The right foods (especially organic, whole foods), on the other hand, can lessen those symptoms.

Protein is a good choice, stick with organic poultry, grass fed beef and organic or pastured raised eggs. Beans can also be a good source of protein. Quality protein are used by the body to make neurotransmitters, the chemicals released by brain cells to communicate with each other. Protein can prevent blood sugar spikes which increase hyperactivity.

GOOD FAT

Fats play a part in our energy, we need fats because they help the slowing of our food absorption, which plays a role in proper energy regulation.  Meaning we will have more energy for longer, unlike sugar which burns off very fast.  Good fats to add to your children’s diet are organic coconut oil, ghee, grass fed butter, cold pressed oils, organic nuts and hemp seeds are all good choices.  Put them in smoothies or salads, or spread on vegetables.

My take away from today is to always choose organic whole foods over processed foods when it comes to feeding your children. If you suspect your child might have behavioral problems try taking a good look at your child’s diet before you do anything else.  Cut out the sugar and processed foods and eat more organic whole food meals.

How have you seen improvements in your child’s behavioral issues with a change to organic food?

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