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Green World

Your Guide to Greywater & Compatible Cleaning Products

I’m a big Reduce-Reuse-Recycle girl, so when I found out about greywater, I was totally on board. This is a great way to reduce our carbon footprint! With the severe drought in California, many people are switching over their laundry to greywater in order to take advantage of the water saving benefits and be able to water outdoor foliage guilt-free! I’ll share the basics of greywater below in the hopes that you will see the benefits and take action as well!greywater

What is Greywater?

Greywater is water that has been gently used and is generally clean of dangerous pollutants from bathroom sinks, showers, tubs, and washing machines. It is not water that has come into contact with feces, either from the toilet or from washing diapers. Greywater may contain traces of dirt, food, grease, hair, and certain household cleaning products. Most of the water we use is wasted and has not actually been used at all – just think of the water wasted while waiting for water to warm in your shower or sink.

What are the Benefits of Using Greywater?

  • Reduces potable (drinking) water use by 16 to 40 percent, depending on the house/site
  • Encourages the use of nontoxic, natural and organic products
  • Reduces the energy needed to convey water through conventional systems by providing locally- generated water
  • Connects people to water supply in their home
  • Provides drought insurance for your landscape
  • Reduces water bills

“When greywater is reused either onsite or nearby, it has the potential to reduce the demand for new water supply, reduce the energy and carbon footprint of water services, and meet a wide range of social and economic needs. In particular, the reuse of greywater can help reduce demand for more costly high-quality potable water.” Overview of Greywater Reuse: The Potential of Greywater Systems to Aid Sustainable Water Management

Are There Safe Cleaning Products to use with Greywater?

This is a great question. YES! Greywater is runoff water from bathroom sinks, showers, tubs and washing machines, and because greywater might have a little dirt, food grease etc., and so it’s best to use products that have natural ingredients with no fillers and no coloring, to begin with. The best brand of cleaning products I’ve been able to find is called Oasis Biocompatible.  Oasis products are made specifically for greywater and are not only safe and natural, they will feed your plants! Oasis provides the means of the sustainable reuse of wash water for irrigation, the most eco-friendly treatment option. By recycling water and nutrients, natural waters are kept pure. Oasis is also great for septic tanks and sewer disposal as well. Here are a couple of links to a couple of their products:

Other Resources:

Everything You Need to Know About Greywater
Overview of Greywater Reuse: The Potential of Greywater Systems to Aid Sustainable Water Management”
How to Reuse Greywater
How-to Video Series: Greywater

Do you have a greywater system yet? If so, how does it work for you?

DIY Cleaning With Essential Oils: Green Your Home

I cringe every time I think about how my mom used things like Comet, Pine-Sol Zep, and Tide when I was growing up. essential oilsBack then when I would smell those things, that meant mom was busy cleaning.  I grew up thinking that was the “clean” smell.  Now I have a totally different view of what clean is supposed to

smell like. It’s supposed to smell like the earth, a natural smell, I guess I’d say. The perfect way to make sure your living space is clean and healthy and germ-free is to use safe cleaning products that you can make yourself, using natural and inexpensive ingredients. It’s cost-effective, simple, satisfying and rewarding. Not only do essential oils help make your home smell good, many essential oils have strong antiseptic, antiviral, antifungal, and antibacterial properties, which make them the best defense against those pesky germs!  Time to clean out your cupboards of those toxic commercial cleaners, and replace them with better no-toxic DIY cleaning products.

DIY Essential Oils Recipes

Lemon All Purpose Cleaner Recipe

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. In a large measuring cup or bowl combine water and vinegar.
  2. Add baking soda a little bit at a time so that the mixture doesn’t fizz up and overflow.
  3. Add drops of oil
  4. Pour mixture in spray bottle
  5. Shake

 

Lavender Air Freshener Recipe

Ingredients:

Now, I used 30-40 teaspoon drops of lavender oil, because I wanted it to be slightly stronger, but you may want to test it with 20 drops first before adding more, just in case!

Instructions:

Spray this on anything. It is wonderful to spray on mattress (let dry for a moment) or in between the sheets.

 

Furniture and Stainless Steel Cleaner Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup oil (vegetable oil, avocado oil, or olive oil)
  • 1/2 squeezed lemon
  • 8-10 drops of lemon essential oil

Instructions:

Add to bottle and use a few drops on clean towel to rub onto surface.

 

Powder Dishwasher Detergent

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups washing soda
  • 1 cup baking soda
  • 10 drops of lemon essential oil

Instructions:

Combine all ingredients and store in a sealed container. To use, add about 2 tablespoons to the soap compartment of your dishwasher. Drop back to 1 1/2 Tablespoons if you find spots on your dishes.

 

Liquid Laundry Soap Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 1 gallon Jugs (I use old vinegar bottles)
  • 3T Borax
  • 3T Washing Soda
  • 2T dish soap (I like to use Dr. Bronners)
  • 10-20 drops of Essential oils (I always use a few drops of Tea Tree, then I mix it up with peppermint, orange, lemon or lavender oils)

Instructions:

Boil a pot of water and pour into jug. When it cools slightly pour in your ingredients (I use a funnel for this, makes it much easier) shake around until mixture dissolves. When the mixtures cools fill the jub with water. Use 1 cup per load.

 

4 Other Uses with Essential oils

  1. Add a few drops of rosemary into your shampoo/conditioner bottles. Rosemary helps stimulate the scalp and promotes circulation and hair growth.
  2. Add about 12 drops of your favorite oil to your bath to help relax. Wild Chamomile, Mellow Mix and Lavender would be great choices.
  3. Add a few drops to your favorite lotion or oil.
  4. Use in a diffuser.

What are your favorite ways to clean with essential oils?

Earth Day Spring Cleaning: 13 Natural Products Using Baking Soda

There are many ways to celebrate Earth Day, but one of the simplest ways, to celebrate is by switching to a greener way to clean. Having children really motivated me to switch to natural products, because so many traditional cleaning products contain a number of harsh chemicals. Those harsh chemicals are not good for the environment and not good for my family! What’s amazing about making the switch is that using natural products is incredibly cost effective. And the best part: one great product, baking soda, can be used to clean just about anything in your house!

Today the spotlight is on baking soda. Yes, baking soda has a ton of uses, not just for baking. Here are some of the ways you use baking soda in place of harsh chemicals for cleaning.

Spring Cleaning: 13 Natural Products Using Baking Sodabaking soda uses

1.      Toilet Bowl Cleaner

Who needs Comet or soft scrub when you can sprinkle baking soda in your toilet bowl? Sprinkle a little bit inside your toilet bowl like you would any other cleaner. After you scrub just let it sit until the next person flushes.

2.      Hair Brush Cleaner

Soak hair brushes and combs in a mixture of 1 teaspoon baking soda and a small amount of warm water. Rinse and dry.

3.      Odor Remover

Keep a small open box or a bowl of baking soda in your fridge to absorb the odor. You can also sprinkle a little in the bottom of your trash can to cut down on the smell.

4.      Scouring

When you have food burned on the bottom of a pot sprinkle in a little baking soda and cover with hot water. Let sit for an hour or so, the burned food will have loosened and be much easier to clean out.

5.      Clean Silver

To shine tarnished silver, combine three parts baking soda with one part water. Rub onto silver with a clean cloth. Rinse thoroughly and dry.

6.      Laundry

Add 1/2 of a cup of baking soda to your wash to freshen your cloths and keep the colors bright. This allows you to use up to 1/2 the amount of detergent.

7.      Drain Cleaner

Pour 1/4 cup baking soda, 1/2 a cup of white vinegar, and a cup of hot water to clean your clogged drains.

8.      Diapers

Sprinkle baking soda on each cloth diaper as you add it to the pail. It will reduce to odor and add a cleaning boost when you wash them.

9.      Soft Scrub

Mix 3 parts baking soda with 1 part dish soap to make a paste to scrub a stubborn stain in your bathroom or kitchen.

10.    Soak Toothbrushes

Soak toothbrushes in a mixture of ¼ cup baking soda and ¼ cup water; let brushes stand overnight for a good cleaning.

11.     Clean Dishwasher

Run dishwasher on an empty cycle with baking soda to clean. You can also do this with your coffee maker too.

12.    Carpets

Sprinkle lightly on your carpet before vacuuming as a natural deodorizer.

How do you use baking soda to clean? What other natural products do you use?

2015 Sustainable Seafood Update

Sustainability is a big issue these days, and it should be. You can define “sustainable” in many ways, but at its core it is an engagement in practices that keep the environment healthy and food production economically and socially viable. This is no different with seafood; sustainable seafood means catching or farming seafood responsibly, with sustainable seafoodconsideration for the long-term health of the environment and the livelihoods of the people that depend upon the environment.  Sounds good right?! I agree, but the big question is how do you know is the seafood at the grocery stores or markets, or even on the menus at the restaurants, came from sustainable sources?

Here are a few tips to help you determine whether or not you’re purchasing sustainable seafood:

  • Buy seafood from knowledgeable, reputable dealers. More and more retailers and chefs are putting into practice sustainable seafood purchasing policies.
  • You’re usually better off eating the local variety. Even out of season, the local fish that haven’t been frozen are preferable.
  • The Marine Stewardship Council certifies seafood that is caught or raised in a sustainable, environmentally friendly manner. When at the grocery store, seafood items that meet its criteria are marked with a MSC-certified label like the one shown here.

MSC logo

  • When at a restaurant or market, ask questions! Ask where is the seafood is from? Does that country manage its fisheries sustainably? 
  • American seafood isn’t perfect, by far, but the U.S. variety of a particular type of seafood is generally better than its imported counterpart, because the U.S. has stricter fishing and farming standards than other parts of the world do.
  • Read your labels and packaging! Look for wild caught instead of out of country or farm raised.
  • Smaller fish tend to be more plentiful and better for your health because they generally contain less mercury. Great small seafood choices include: squid, oysters, mackerel, sardines and mussel.

The Best in Sustainable Seafood:

  • Catfish (U.S.)
  • Clam, Mussels, Oysters
  • Cod: Pacific (U.S. hook & line)
  • Crawfish (U.S. Farmed)
  • Mahi Mahi (U.S. Atlantic troll, pole)
  • Salmon (Alaska)
  • Sardines Pacific (Canada & U.S.)
  • Tilapia (Ecuador & U.S.)
  • Tuna: Albacore/White canned (U.S. Canada)
  • Trout: Rainbow (U.S Farmed)

Seafood to Avoid:

  • Conch (wild)
  • Crab: Red King (Russia)
  • Crawfish: (China)
  • Salmon: Atlantic
  • Shark
  • Shrimp (imported, L.A. Wild)
  • Orange Roughy
  • Mahi Mahi (imported)

The above recommendations come from The Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, I just listed a few. For more information or to look up a different species of seafood go to their site

To find out more up-to-date current info on which seafood is sustainable, farmed or even what is in season check out these wonderful resources:

6 New Year’s Resolutions for a Green Home

green homeIn the new year, many people will be making all sorts of resolutions like weight loss, quitting a bad habit, or maybe even something like running a marathon. All these resolutions are wonderful, but I think one of the best resolutions you can make is to take steps to create a green home. What does it mean to go green? Simply put, it means implementing certain lifestyle changes designed to help you live in a more eco-friendly way of life. It means becoming more environmentally aware and changing your behavior and lifestyle to reduce the amount of pollution and waste you generate.

We can do so much of that in our own home, and for little to no cost! I will give you six super easy and inexpensive tips to help make yourself a green home this coming New Year.

6 Tips to a Green Home

1. Enroll in online statements and get off junk mail lists

Many utility providers, cable companies, financial institutions, and more offer the option to receive online statements instead of printed statements. You just need to log in to the company’s website and change your preferences, or you can try calling the company’s customer service to do it that way. Reducing the amount of mail you receive reduces your impact on the environment in several ways. First, it reduces the number of trees that are cut down, which means there will be more trees converting carbon dioxide into oxygen. Second, a reduction in the amount of mail also reduces the amount of airplane/ vehicle delivery exhaust. Thirdly, it reduces the need for ink, which most of the time contains toxic chemical ingredients, and which takes a lot of fossil fuels to produce and distribute. Lastly, it reduces the amount of paper that ends up in landfills.

2. Unplug Electronics When Not In Use

Anything that has an LED (light emitting diode) that glows even after you turn it off continues to draw power (that you pay for). Your TV, cell phone charger, and printer are likely culprits. Unplug the offenders from wall sockets and plug them into power strips instead. When you leave a room, flip the strip switch to cut the flow of electricity. Just by doing this simple tip could save you up to $200 a year

3. No Shoes Allowed

Taking your shoes off before you enter your home is one is one of the easiest steps you can take to make your home more green and safe. Why? Well studies have shown that people track in all sorts of harmful toxins from outside the home when they walk into the house without removing their shoes. These toxins persist in the air in the form of dust, which is inhaled and absorbed by our skin as it settles on the floor and furniture. Chemicals stay in the air and on surfaces longer in our homes than they do outdoors, where the sun and rain help break down pesticide residues. This is especially important if you have small children, they spend most of their time on or near the floor, and can breathe in and touch chemical-laden dust or soil tracked in by shoes.  Little kids who are constantly putting their hands and other objects in their mouths can ingest these dangerous particles and toxins, as well.

4. Recycle and Compost

Most cities will pick up and process recyclable material, and several (including San Francisco and Seattle) will also pick up compostable food material and yard waste. But let’s face it: You won’t recycle or compost if you don’t make it easy for yourself. Make sure to have bins for trash and recycling in every room, not just the kitchen! Tons of recyclable material is thrown away in homes offices and bathrooms because the recycling bin is too far away.

Half the trash that homes produce is composed of food scraps. When those go to the dump, they do nothing, but if you have a compost bin at your house, you can use those scraps to make fertilizer for your garden. Most outdoor composters cost between $100 and $600, depending on how large and secure they are. A more inexpensive choice is a DYI compost bin.

5. Wash Fewer but Fuller Loads of Laundry

Whenever you wash just a few clothes or dishes at a time rather than waiting for a full load to accumulate, you’re wasting water, power, and money. On average  most  American families  of four washes around 540 loads of laundry a year, which consumes up to 21,000 gallons of water, and more than 150 loads of dishes, which uses about 1,500 gallons. All that energy is mostly consumed by washers and dishwashers to heat the water — about 90 percent in the clothes washer and 80 percent in the dishwasher. If you have to do short loads of laundry choose short cycles and use cold water. Just by washing two fewer loads of clothes and one less load of dishes a week and save up to 4,500 gallons of water a year!

6. Switch your cleaning products

What is the difference between natural cleaning products and traditional?  The big difference is the active ingredient.  Traditional cleaning products tend to have artificially produced cleaning agents, typically compounds that do not occur in nature.  These tend to be toxic when introduced to nature and don’t break down (biodegrade) in nature very well.  Green cleaning products tend to have naturally occurring compounds, like vinegar or Orange oil, or baking soda; and those that are man-made are biodegradable i.e. they quickly break down into naturally occurring substances that nature can recycle.  As a result Green products are less toxic to the environment.  For just about every traditional cleaning product you use, there is a natural alternative you can use in your green home.  If you’re not sure where to start, try HERE.

Those are just six simple easy and inexpensive tips you can use to make your home more green in 2015!

What steps are you taking to create a green home?

Natural Body Care Tips: Keep Your Skin Hydrated All Winter

natural body careOne of the biggest complaints during winter season is having dry, chapped, itchy, and or sensitive skin. The reason is because in winter, there is cold, dry air and very little humidity. If we are not properly hydrated we lose moisture in our skin which leaves our skin feeling and looking less desirable. Before you decide to relocate to a warmer, more humid climate, take these steps to seal in the moisture and repair your winter skin.

Natural Body Care Tips for Keeping Your Skin Hydrated

Hydrate

The first and most important natural body care tip for hydrated skin is water.  Water is the most common nutritional deficiency in America. We just don’t drink enough water here. Did you know water cannot be stored, it’s being continually distributed and regulated throughout our body. This nakes daily water intake essential for a healthy body and healthy skin.  The rule of thumb is to drink half of your body weight in ounces of water each day (Ex: A person weighing 160 pounds should drink 80 ounces of water each day). If you are one of those people who have a hard time drinking water visit my fruits and herb flavored water recipes and combinations post for tasty, easy ways to drink water.

Rethink Processed Foods

The second natural body care tip for hydrated skin may surprise you – its not about what you’re putting in or on you’re body, its what NOT to!  Foods with refined (overly processed) sugars dehydrate your skin, making it dry and less clear. Combined with the winter elements, loading up on these foods (which are usually high in trans fats, MSG, etc.) will leave you feeling blue this winter season. Though I would love to tell you to cut processed foods out completely (we all get cravings now and then), try to limit your processed foods in your home and replace them with more nutritious, whole food options.

Winter Showering

You might not like this natural body care tip but it does help a great deal.  Even though there is nothing better than taking a long, hot, relaxing bath on a cold winter day, it doesn’t do any favors for our skin. Long hot baths and showers have a drying effect on our skin. To help limit that you can add some bath salts or even sea salt to your bath water and taking shorter and cooler showers. Also applying moisturizer to the skin (coconut oil is my top choice) within 3 minutes of stepping out of the shower or bath will help keep skin hydrated. Avoid using soaps and deodorants with fragrance, or alcohol because they can strip your skin of its natural oils.

Vitamins for Skin

In order for your skin to look great, it has to be healthy. Vitamin B helps to restore collagen (a protein that keeps it firm) in the skin, which is especially important as you age. So load up on Vitamin B rich foods like whole grains, nuts, seeds and protein (bone broth is excellent source of collagen) to keep your skin looking healthy and hydrated! Vitamin E (most abundant nutrient found in the skin) also helps with the formation of collagen, and therefore can reduce wrinkles, scaring and increase hydration. Fish, nuts, avocados, olive oil, and spinach are excellent sources of vitamin E.

Fruit

Fruit, especially water-dense tropical fruit, is a great way to hydrate and protect your skin. Most fruit contains high levels of vitamins A and C, powerful antioxidant that replenishes nutrients in skin, promote collagen production, and help keep your skin supple and firm. Oranges, raspberries, cantaloupe, mangoes, pineapple, strawberries blueberries, watermelon, and grapefruits all contain skin-boosters, and are a tasty treat too.

Natural & Organic Moisturizers

When your skin needs a little extra in those cold, dry months and you reach for a body lotion, make sure you’re using ones with all natural and organic ingredients.  Some conventional lotions contain ingredients that actually dry out your skin.  Some of the better brands to look for are EO’s Everyone Lotion, Andalou Naturals, and Nourish.

I hope these natural body care tips help you to keep your skin hydrated and healthy all winter long. What are your favorite tips and tricks to keep your skin hydrated?

DIY: Naturally Dyed Easter Eggs

naturally dyed easter eggs

By Will Merydith from Fairfield, Iowa, USA (Natural Easter Colored Eggs) [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Did you know that you can dye Easter eggs naturally using herbs, spices, fruits and veggies?  Dyeing times are a little longer and the colors are less intense than chemical dyes, but these naturally dyed Easter eggs are a better choice for your family and for the environment.

There are two ways to dye Easter eggs naturally; either boil raw eggs in the naturally colored water, or soak hard boiled eggs in the colored water overnight.  The first way is faster if you’re only using one or two colors but if you want to use a lot of different colors, its easier to make the colored soaking water and use smaller bowls to soak the hard boiled eggs in the refrigerator overnight.

To make the natural dyes, choose a natural ingredient from the list below.  The quantity that you use will determine how dark the color is.  Add distilled water and either cream of tartar or white vinegar to a non-aluminum pot.  Use 1 TBSP cream of tartar or vinegar per cup of water.  If you’re using raw eggs, boil them in the colored water like you normally would to cook hard boiled eggs.  You can then either remove the eggs or if you want them darker you can continue to soak them in the refrigerator.

If you’re using hard boiled eggs, you can make batches of different colors, then use smaller bowls to soak the eggs overnight in the refrigerator. If the eggs don’t come out as dark as you want the first time, you can make a darker colored soak water and let the eggs soak a second time.

Natural dyes are made with just a handful of ingredients.  You’ll need water, the natural material for coloring, and a mordant to help the colors penetrate the eggshell.  The mordant can be cream of tartar or white vinegar.

Naturally Dyed Easter Eggs Instructions:

  • Place the eggs in a single layer in a pan. Add water until the eggs are covered.
  • Add vinegar or cream of tartar.
  • Add the natural dye materials. Use more dye material for more eggs or for a more intense color.
  • Bring water to a boil.
  • Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
  • If you are happy with the color, remove the eggs from the liquid.
  • For more intensely colored eggs, remove the eggs from the liquid. Strain the dye through a coffee filter or cheesecloth.  Cover the eggs with the filtered dye and let them soak in the refrigerator overnight.

Here’s a list of some herbs and spices you can use and the colors they yield:

Hibiscus flowers – Reddish blue/lavender
Turmeric root powder – Deep gold
Curry powder – Pale orange
Chili powder – Reddish brown
Paprika – Orange
Dill seed – Golden brown
Beet Juice – Pink
Coffee – Brown
Cranberry Juice – Pink
Red Cabbage Leaves – Blue
Onion Skins – Red or Yellow depending on the type of onion
Orange Peels – Pale Orange
Grape Juice – Lavender
Spinach Leaves – Green
Pomegranate Juice – Red

Find many of these natural dye materials HERE.

What are your favorite Easter traditions? Share with us in the comments below.

Cloth Diapers vs. Disposable Diapers: A Look at Both the Pros & Cons

Cloth diapers vs. disposable diapers?  Which am I going to use on my baby?  If you are a mom, most importantly a new momma I am sure you have pondered this question once or twice before.  I know I did. On average your cloth-diapersbaby will probably spend around 25,000 hours in a diaper and need about 6,000 diaper changes in their first years of life. Crazy thought huh?!

Your decision to use disposable or cloth diapers will not only have a great impact on your baby’s comfort and health; it can also impact the environment, and your pocket as well.  Today we’re going to look at the pros and cons of both types of diapers!  Hopefully after you read this you will get a better idea of how you want to diaper your sweet baby!

Disposable Diapers

Pros

  • Easy to use
  • Easy to dispose

Cons

  • In a baby’s lifetime it will cost anywhere from $2000-2500 if using disposable diapers and if you are using organic eco-friendly disposables it is going to cost  you more around $3,000
  • They are horrible for our environment it is estimated that around 5 million tons of untreated waste is deposited into landfills via disposables every year.
  • Harder to potty-train; toddlers can’t feel wetness as much with disposables, so it’s harder for them to potty-train.
  • More diaper-rash; according to one study, 78% of babies in disposable diapers get diaper-rash, compared to only 7% of cloth diapered babies.
  • A study published in the Archives of Environmental Health in 1999, found that disposable diapers do release chemicals called volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene and dipentene. VOCs are linked to toxic health effects over time and with a high level of exposure, including cancer and brain damage.

Cloth Diapers

Pros:

  • It’s cheaper; cloth diapers can be expensive for the initial set-up ($250-$700), but in the long run they work out a lot cheaper than disposables, depending on what system you use.
  • Reusable and eco-friendly.  Make sure you are using natural detergents like Charlie’s Soap or Allen’s Naturally to get these diapers clean, and if they’re really stinky, try Stink Out, a laundry additive especially for cloth diapers.
  • Less diaper-rash; cloth diapered babies tend to have less diaper-rash, because natural cotton fibers breathe more easily.
  • Can be used for future children; works out even cheaper because you can use for any more children you have.
  • Cloth diapered children tend to potty-train earlier, because the cloth tends to hold moisture closer to baby’s skin.
  • No more of the scary pins your mom had to deal with. Cloth diapers now come with Velcro or snap closures, shapes fitted to baby, waterproof bands around the waist and legs, and removable linings, making the cloth change just as quick and easy as the disposable.
  • Cloth diapers are CUTE… have you seen all the different patterns, colors and styles they come in?!

Cons:

  • Not as convenient as disposables.
  • Have to carry your dirty diapers around with you.
  • Not as absorbent as disposables causing you to change your baby more often.

Now that you have an idea of the pros and cons of both types of diapers which one are you going to choose?  I truly believe that if you want to truly go organic, cloth diapers is the only way to go.  Using cloth diapers ensures that you are not only protecting our planet but your precious baby more importantly.  If you still decide to use disposable diapers I highly recommend finding organic, disposable diapers and staying away from conventional, diapers (Pampers, Huggies etc).  As I sit here writing this blog post I can tell you that like the breastfeeding vs. organic baby formula debate, I have experience with each side of the debate when it comes to my own children.  I currently have a 23 month old and I started out using cloth diapers with her then switching to cheap disposable diapers when my life got hectic (I also gave away all my cloth diapers – big mistake!).  Well, you know what I just did while writing this post?  I ordered more cloth diapers!  Hopefully these pros and cons inspire you as well!

Some Eco-Friendly disposable diapers:

  • Naty Natural Babycare
  • Nurtured by Nature
  • Seventh Generation Free and Clear Baby Diapers
  • Earth’s Best Tender Care Chlorine Free Diapers

Have you cloth diapered your children?  If so do you have any tips or tricks or gentle advice for new mothers just starting out?  We would love to hear your comments!

Also check out how easily and quickly you can make your own eco-friendly, organic baby wipes.

Failure to Yield – The Truth About GMOs

I just finished watching the movie Genetic Roulette online for the third time. Each time I watch it, I notice some new facet about Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) that I hadn’t noticed as clearly before. This time, it was the stark fact that the chemical companies who promote GMOs have been promising that the use of GMOs would create higher yields of food and therefore feed the world. Read the Union of Concern Scientists’ Failure to Yield report.

The truth is quite different. First, without GMOs, there is plenty of food in the world to feed everyone. The problem is not the production of food, but the distribution of food which is a whole other problem to solve.  So, let’s put that misinformation to rest.

Still, chemical companies would have you believe that we NEED GMOs in order to manage our production so we can all eat more at a lower cost. In most industrialized nations, the problem is not about having enough food and it’s become more a problem of having healthy food.

According to the Union of Concern Scientists, the promises of increased production are false. According to the USC, “Despite 20 years of research and 13 years of commercialization, genetic engineering has failed to significantly increase U.S. crop yields.”

In fact, many farmers are beginning to see that their yields are lower after buying these GMO seeds and spraying chemical products on those seeds. One cotton farmer interviewed in Genetic Roulette said he began to really question his initial decision to use GMO seed when he began reading the dire health warnings on the seed bag itself. Don’t eat it, don’t touch it, don’t breath it, don’t let it touch your skin….sounds like the warning label on poison, doesn’t it?

The bottom line is this – chemical companies like Monsanto have been promoting the use of chemicals under the promise of higher yields (i.e. more crops for the farmer as lower costs), and that has not been the case. As farmers see their crop yields drop and their animals suffer from eating GMO crops, they’re beginning to understand that their livelihood depends on them NOT using GMOs.

The tide is turning and as the links between GMOs and human health, livestock health, crop yields and agricultural sustainability are known, people will vote with their dollars and avoid GMOs. Our health as a nation, as a world and as a species literally depends on it.

Mrs. Green Goes Mainstream

I just finished a two hour meeting with an amazing woman who is on a mission to change the world. Her vision is similar to ours at shopOrganic, so it was great to meet this dynamic woman, Mrs. Green, as she’s known to her universe. She hosts an hour-long radio show on a local station (hoping to become syndicated for all of you out there in radio land) about how mainstream Americans can go green. But more than that, she is living the journey. She’s discovering the wide world of organics, sustainable agriculture, sustainable technologies, and all things green. What I like best about her is that she doesn’t profess to be the expert who will tell you what to do – she’s more like the trail guide on a path that she’s discovering as she leads you forward. You can listen to past shows on her site and she’s had some really interesting guests. So, visit  www.mrsgreengoesmainstream.com, sign up for her newsletter, listen to past shows or tune in live for her Saturday shows (they’re streamed live) and enjoy learning more about the green possibilities in your life!

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